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1, 2, 3
No AVB switch needed for this setup!
Read more in the next post...

;-)

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by wahlerstudios on Tue Apr 30, 2019 9:36 am
This is perfect WYSIWYG... Everything shown in the picture is based on direct connections. There is a long CAT5e cable going from the SL 16 at FOH into the 16M (AVB In) and a short CAT5e cable going from the 16M (AVB Thru) to the 32R. The router is connected to the SL 16. It's possible to get more 16Ms involved; used this way they need their power supply. Connected to the headphone output of the 16M is a "Mini Body Pack" with passive volume control (http://www.fischer-amps.de/en/in-ear-mo ... phery.html) and a 3 meter stereo extension cable.

I think I will use this setup in the summer season, in order to be able to supply at least one in ear "station" if there is a spontaneous need. Sometimes it happens that a drummer prefers in ear monitoring over a wedge, and the band leader has not communicated this, because he didn't know. Then it' s good to be able to offer this solution. The stereo Aux In will allow the drummer to add click to his in ears and control the volume separately from his in ear mix. Mixing on stage is done via iPad. There is always somebody the musicians can turn to.

Soon my third 16M will be here. I really love these toys... ;-)

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by wahlerstudios on Wed May 01, 2019 8:05 am
EarMixer as iPad replacement...

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by wahlerstudios on Wed May 01, 2019 8:05 am
This is my standard setup: a 32R rack mixer and a 4-channel digital amplifier. A router is built-in in the amplifier rack as well as a Adam Hall Power Strip 1 U 19" with 16 outlets (8 outlets on the front, 8 on the back). An iPad is used to control the rack mixer. Twice in a month I use this setup for a choir rehearsal and the requirement is always identical: two channels for an electric piano, one channel for the microphone of the lead singer, one channel for moderation and two channels for music (CD player). I have a "project" stored for this setting, which has been optimized over a long period, so I don't really need an iPad and UC Surface. I just load the project and the rehearsal can start.

A EarMix 16M can fit well in a situation like this. It's connected directly to the rack mixer. The only thing which is different is the use of the 16Ms Line Outputs instead of the rack mixers outputs. If there is a need to change volumes, it can be done on the 16M. It doesn't need any further processing than what is already stored in the project's scene.

For mixing severaI inputs I would prefer using the iPad, but for standard situations with always the same settings a 16M is a good alternative. A router is not needed when a 16M is involved.

Useful for:
* Speech/moderation + instrument
* Music (DJ) + moderation
* Speech/moderation only
* Music only
* Instrument only

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by wahlerstudios on Thu May 02, 2019 10:12 am
Coming soon... ;-)

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by wahlerstudios on Fri May 03, 2019 5:52 am
How to get 32 flex mixes from SL 16 (SL 24/32/32S/32SC/32SX) and 32R?

Short answer: Use the 32R in Monitor Mixer Mode (16 flex mixes) and send the 16 flex mixes of the console as AVB sends to the EarMixers on stage.

Long answer: In Stagebox Mode, the 32R supplies 32 input channels, 16 flex mix outputs and 2 Main (L/R) outputs, which all are controlled via the SL 16 as FOH console. In Monitor Mixer Mode, the 32R controls 16 flex mixes, while the SL 16 controls Main (L/R). In this setup the SL 16 controls its own 10 "local" flex mixes (the SL 16 has only 10 flex mix outputs) and but Main L/R can also be used at FOH.

I was curious to see what happens with the AVB sends in Monitor Mixer Mode and how or if SL 16 and 32R are interacting. What I saw immediately was that they do NOT interact. The 32R sends the 32 input channels to the AVB network, but its 16 flex mixes are simply not handled as AVB sends. The AVB sends remain at the SL 16, so the flex mixes available in an AVB network are the flex mixes of the FOH mixer!

This makes sense because the 32R is the monitor mixer with its own 16 physical/audio aux mixes, which no other mixer in the network needs to "see". As the SL 16 as FOH mixer sends its 16 flex mixes to the AVB network, there is no conflict between sources. Consequently you can assign the available 64 AVB sends of the FOH mixer freely and send any combination of signals and mixes to the EarMixers.

This gives you a total of 32 flex mixes - available on ALL Series III 32-channel consoles in combination with a 32R rack mixer. You will need an AVB Switch and one or more EarMix 16M to get access to flex mixes 17 to 32. Both mixers should also be connected to a router for remote control.

I suppose that it is also possible to send flex mixes 17-32 to a second 32R rack mixer, which then should be used in Stagebox Mode. This will give you physcial outputs to all 32 flex mixes. It would be interesting to test this configuration. ;-)

Flex Mix 1-16 (32R = physical outputs)
Flex Mix 17-32 (SL 16/24/32/32S/32SC/32SX = AVB)

or Flex Mix 17-32 on a second 32R via AVB for physical outputs

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by wahlerstudios on Tue May 07, 2019 2:08 pm
Summing Aux Mixes

Adding AVB sends 57 to 64 to the network was a real blessing for the EarMixers, because these 8 streams can easily become something like THE STANDARD ROUTING for EarMixers. Why? Because they do not collide with the 32 input channel sends, the 16 sends used for flex mixes and the 8 sends used for functional signals like Aux Ins and L/R.

In a "mixed" setup of aux/flex mixes and EarMixers you will sooner or later need all 64 AVB sends. Personal mixers like the EarMix 16M are perfect for musicians which (more or less) stay at their place during a performance. Drums, bass, guitar and keyboard are perfect "candidates" for personal mixers and as four stereo in ear mixes need one AVB bank, using AVB sends 57 to 64 is the most obvious to do. The four EarMixers imvolved will then have this channel layout:

01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08

09+10 Drums Mix | console auxes 09+10 | AVB sends 57+58
11+12 Bass Mix | console auxes 11+12 | AVB sends 59+60
13+14 Guitar Mix | console auxes 13+14 | AVB sends 61+62
15+16 Keyboard Mix | console auxes 15+16 | AVB sends 63+64

If you are using a monitor mixer on stage (adding aux mixes 17 to 32), it's the console sending its 16 mixes to the EarMixers via AVB network and "mix" means mix, with all necessary sound processing AND reverb/effects/ambience microphones. I always reserve one of the FX slots of the console just for the in ear mixes, used prefade in order to be able to work with steady levels. It does take some time and attention to get the right mixes for the four musicians, because everybody needs different FX. But once a good balance is found, you can hear that "space" in the mixes, which basically means reflections to open the mixes, making them sound more natural and lively.

But that is only one aspect. Musicians need to be able to make changes to what they hear between songs and sometimes even during songs, so how can you handle this need? There is an easy answer. In the given example, each musician already hears a well-balanced mix of EVERYTHING happening on stage and around (talkback, click, playbacks etc.) with his own instrument as the dominant part of the mix. This means that there are four of those specific MIXES available on each EarMixer. So, if the drummer wants to hear more bass, he can simply raise the volume of the bass player's stereo mix. The same goes for the other two instruments.

The interesting thing happening then is that this does not only add a single sound event (bass), but the inspiring mix which the bass player hears as his own ear mix. Consequently there is not only more bass/guitar/keyboard heard, but more "instrument in its own space". It's amazing how adding mixes of that kind and quality can make your own hearing more enjoyable. Finally you have the feeling of being on stage again and you get musical inspiration from what the colleagues are playing!

Of course, I would also "fill" the first eight AVB sends with single sound events, which are important for the show/event, like:

01 Vocals 1
02 Vocals 2
03 Vocals 3
04 Vocals 4
05 Saxophone
06
07
08 Speech/Moderation

The input sources must not be AVB sends 1 to 8. You can use any of the eight input banks. It all depends how you design your input and output structure. Adding single sound events means that you hear them with no FX. This will disturb the "feel" of your in ear mix, so vocals and saxophone (examples) should already be part of your aux mix. But sometimes it is good to have the option of raising the volume of a single sound event for a specific moment or even a whole song.

This is just an idea of how to use the EarMixers and the new eight AVB sends in a creative way. Basically, this is what an matrix mix does, just with less faders to move. The key is a well balanced stereo mix for each musician, which become connected together - with the option to add single sound events, which are not "static" or can not be static due to several reasons.

My example band was drums, bass, guitar and keyboard, four singers and saxophone. I would use the 16 flex mixes of the rack mixer for the singers and the saxophone player, to feed their in ear systems or wedges on stage. Remote Control for the auxes on the console is not really needed, but of course possible.

SL16 | 32R | 16M

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by wahlerstudios on Wed May 08, 2019 7:57 am
http://blog.presonus.com/index.php/2019 ... -scenarios

"Advanced EarMix 16M Routing for Whole-Band Scenarios"

The five videos are finished now and replace their "Approval" predecessors. "Richard Gaspard takes you on a deep dive on configuring and using the EarMix 16M for a whole band scenario in this five-part series." The approach shows how you can consider the different needs of musicians and how flexible the EarMix system is. It's simply unrivaled!

These settings were used for the videos:

1) AVB Sends used on EarMixers
Drums: AVB Sends: 1-8 + 9-16
Bass: AVB Sends: 17-24 + 25-21
Keyboard: AVB Sends 33-40 + 41-48
Guitars: AVB Sends 49-56 + 57-64

2) Flex mixes
Aux 1+2 stereo drum kit
Aux 2+4 stereo drum kt, minus kick and snare
Aux 5+6 three stereo keyboards
Aux 7 three guitars
Aux 8 three vocals

3) Channel inputs SL 24:
1 Kick
2 Snare
3 HiHat
4 Tom 1
5 Tom 2
6 Tom 3
7 OH left
8 OH right
9 Bass
10 Guitar 1
11 Guitar 2
12 Ac. Guitar
13 Keyboard 1 left
14 Keyboard 1 right
15 Keyboard 2 left
16 Keyboard 2 right
17 Keyboard 3 left
18 Keyboard 3 right
19 Vocal 1
20 Vocal 2
21 Vocal 3
22 Click
23 Track left
24 Track right

4) Drum EarMix Chanels (AVB Sends 1-8 + 9-16)
1 Kick
2 Snare
3 HiHat
4 Tom 1
5 Tom 2
6 Tom 3
7 OH left
8 OH right
9 Bass
10 Guitars mix (Aux 7)
11 Keyboards mix left (Aux 5)
12 Keyboards mix right (Aux 6)
13 Vocals (Aux 8)
14 Click
15 Track left
16 Track right

5) Bass EarMix Channels (AVB Sends 17-24 + 25-32)
1 Kick
2 Snare
3 Drums mix minus kick/snare left (Aux 3)
4 Drums mix minus kick/snare right (Aux 4)
5 Bass
6 Bass
7 Track left
8 Track right
9 Guitar 1
10 Guitar 2
11 Ac. Guitar
12 Vocal 1
13 Vocal 2
14 Vocal 3
15 Keyboards left (Aux 5
16 Keyboards right (Aux 6)

6) Keyboard EarMix Channels (AVB Sends 33-40 + 41-48)
1 Drums mix complete left (Aux 1)
2 Drums mix complete right (Aux 2)
3 Bass
4 Click
5 Track left
6 Track right
8 Guitars mix (Aux 7)
8 Vocal 1
9 Vocal 2
10 Vocal 3
11 Keyboard 1 left
12 Keyboard 1 right
13 Keyboard 2 left
14 Keyboard 2 right
15 Keyboard 3 left
16 Keyboard 3 right

7) Guitar EarMix Channels (AVB Sends 49-56 + 57-64)
1 Drums mix complete left (Aux 1)
2 Drums mix complete right (Aux 2)
3 Bass
4 Click
5 Track left
6 Track right
7 Keyboards mix left (Aux 5)
8 Keyboards mix right (Aux 6)
9 Vocal 1
10 Vocal 2
11 Vocal 3
12 Guitar 1
13 Guitar 2
14 Ac. Guitar
15 --
16 --

SL16 | 32R | 16M

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by wahlerstudios on Fri May 10, 2019 6:04 am
If you are having difficulties to figure out how ìt works with the individual routing for the four EarMixers, this list might be of help. AVB networking allows multiple patching. It is possible to send single "input" signals simultaneoulsy to several "outputs". This is the idea behind the videos.

I start with the drums' EarMix and list all 16 input channels with the delivering AVB send and where this send comes from. This approach might look different to what is explained in the videos, but it is exactly the same. "Cha" means input channel, "Aux" means flex mix.

Drum EarMix Chanels (AVB Sends 1-8 + 9-16)
01_AVB 01 | Cha 01 = Kick
02_AVB 02 | Cha 02 = Snare
03_AVB 03 | Cha 03 = HiHat
04_AVB 04 | Cha 04 = Tom 1
05_AVB 05 | Cha 05 = Tom 2
06_AVB 06 | Cha 06 = Tom 3
07_AVB 07 | Cha 07 = OH left
08_AVB 08 | Cha 08 = OH right
09_AVB 09 | Cha 09 = Bass
10_AVB 10 | Aux 07 = Guitar mix
11_AVB 11 | Aux 05 = Keyboards mix left
12_AVB 12 | Aux 06 = Keyboards mix right
13_AVB 13 | Aux 08 = Vocals mix
14_AVB 14 | Cha 22 = Click
15_AVB 15 | Cha 23 = Track left
16_AVB 16 | Cha 24 = Track right

Bass EarMix Channels (AVB Sends 17-24 + 25-32)
01_AVB 17 | Cha 01 = Kick
02_AVB 18 | Cha 02 = Snare
03_AVB 19 | Aux 03 = Drums mix minus kick/snare left
04_AVB 20 | Aux 04 = Drums mix minus kick/snare right
05_AVB 21 | Cha 09 = Bass
06_AVB 22 | Cha 22 = Click
07_AVB 23 | Cha 23 = Track left
08_AVB 24 | Cha 24 = Track right
09_AVB 25 | Cha 10 = Guitar 1
10_AVB 26 | Cha 11 = Guitar 2
11_AVB 27 | Cha 12 = Ac. Guitar
12_AVB 28 | Cha 19 = Vocal 1
13_AVB 29 | Cha 20 = Vocal 2
14_AVB 30 | Cha 21 = Vocal 3
15_AVB 31 | Aux 05 = Keyboard mix left
16_AVB 32 | Aux 06 = Keyboard mix right

Keyboard EarMix Channels (AVB Sends 33-40 + 41-48)
01_AVB 33 | Aux 01 = Drums mix complete left
02_AVB 34 | Aux 02 = Drums mix complete right
03_AVB 35 | Cha 09 = Bass
04_AVB 36 | Cha 22 = Click
05_AVB 37 | Cha 23 = Track left
06_AVB 38 | Cha 24 = Track right
07_AVB 39 | Aux 07 = Guitar mix
08_AVB 40 | Cha 19 = Vocal 1
09_AVB 41 | Cha 20 = Vocal 2
10_AVB 42 | Cha 23 = Vocal 3
11_AVB 43 | Cha 13 = Key 1 left
12_AVB 44 | Cha 14 = Key 1 right
13_AVB 45 | Cha 15 = Key 2 left
14_AVB 46 | Cha 16 = Key 2 right
15_AVB 47 | Cha 17 = Key 3 left
16_AVB 48 | Cha 18 = Key 3 right

Guitar EarMix Channels (AVB Sends 49-56 + 57-64)
01_AVB 49 | Aux 01 = Drums mix complete left
02_AVB 50 | Aux 02 = Drums mix complete right
03_AVB 51 | Cha 09 = Bass
04_AVB 52 | Cha 22 = Click
05_AVB 53 | Cha 23 = Track left
06_AVB 54 | Cha 24 = Track right
07_AVB 55 | Aux 05 = Keyboards mix left
08_AVB 56 | Aux 06 = Keyboards mix right
09_AVB 57 | Cha 19 = Vocal 1
10_AVB 58 | Cha 20 = Vocal 2
11_AVB 59 | Cha 21 = Vocal 3
12_AVB 60 | Cha 10 = Guitar 1
13_AVB 61 | Cha 11 = Guitar 2
14_AVB 62 | Cha 12 = Ac. Guitar
15_AVB 63 | --
16_AVB 64 | --

Looking at the AVB sends only can be somehow confusing, so it might be helpful to change the point of view to the signals and their destinations. Here are some examples:

Channel 01 = Kick -> AVB sends 01 + 17
Channel 02 = Snare -> AVB sends 02 + 18
Channel 03 = HiHat -> AVB send 03
Channel 10 = Guitar 1 -> AVB sends 09 + 60
Channel 12 = Ac. Guitar -> AVB sends 27 + 62
Channel 19 = Vocal 1 -> AVB sends 28, 40 + 57
Channel 23 = Track left -> AVB sends 15, 23, 37 + 53
Aux 05 = Keyboards mix left -> AVB sends 11, 31 + 55
Aux 06 = Keyboards mix right -> AVB sends 12, 32 + 56
Aux 07 = Guitar mix -> AVB sends 10 + 39
Aux 08 = Vocals mix -> AVB send 08

and so on.

It's very easy to make these settings "per channel" in UC Surface. Go to channel/aux Settings -> Routing -> O (Output) and select all AVB sends you want to patch the signal to. This page in Settings can also be used to check patching. If a signal is not arriving somewhere, you can see in UC Surface if a missing patch is the reason.

Based on the video project, here are some labels (PDF document) for the EarMixers. The labels are meant as visual orientation for the musicians and as help to find the input signals they are looking for. For the people doing the layout of the network, the labels can be helpful to see if the settings fit to the musicians' workflow.

Attachments
EarMix Labels Video.jpg
EarMix Labels Video.pdf
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by wahlerstudios on Sun May 12, 2019 2:36 pm
After studying and analyzing the concept of the video project, I think there should be a thorough evaluation following now. Is the approach really "advanced"...? Basically, I find the solution very interesting and it is a good idea to send specific signals via multiple AVB sends to each musician. But I have some questions...

My question No. 1 is: Having 64 AVB sends available is a real blessing, but why should a relatively small band "eat up" 62 of them? The remaining AVB sends 63+64 are needed to transport Main L/R from FOH to stage, so in this scenario there are no AVB sends available any more for monitors / sidefills / aux subs / IEM on stage or other sound applications. This might not be a problem for the projected band, but others will see the limits of this approach right away.

Question No. 2, with less sends in mind:
* Tracks left+right are so important that they need to have their own sends?
* Does the whole band need to hear the click?
* Do all keyboards need AVB sends? Is one keyboard MIX not enough? Does it really need three more keyboard mixes?

On the other hand, from a musician's point of view, some things seem to be too much reduced. As an example: The drummer gets access to all his drum channels (which makes sense) and keyboards in stereo, but all guitars and vocals come as mono mixes. Musically this doesn't look very inspiring.

Question No. 3, with more sends in mind:
Is a guitar mix in mono suitable?
Shouldn't all electric guitars nowadays get two input channels?
Where is FX / ambience (stereo)?
Where is talkback?

And question No. 4 is:
What is left, what is right?

Of course I know the concept of stage left and stage right etc., which is determined by the view FROM THE STAGE. So, what is "guitar 1" and where on stage is this musician located...? Or vocal 1, vocal 2, vocal 3...? There needs to be a definition and a concept for the patching. I would always think and organize inputs and outputs in the view FROM FOH TO STAGE, which means that vocal 1 is the one I realize LEFT on stage (which is stage right seen from stage). See the problem?

Consequently, all stereo mixes (drums, keyboards, tracks) need a definition for left and right, which can be executed in the patching. Here is an example for the Drum EarMix Chanels (AVB Sends 1-8 + 9-16):

View from FOH:
01_AVB 01 | Cha 01 = Kick
02_AVB 02 | Cha 02 = Snare
03_AVB 03 | Cha 03 = HiHat
04_AVB 04 | Cha 04 = Tom 1 (low)
05_AVB 05 | Cha 05 = Tom 2 (mid)
06_AVB 06 | Cha 06 = Tom 3 (high)
07_AVB 07 | Cha 07 = OH left
08_AVB 08 | Cha 08 = OH right

View from stage / EarMix user:
01_AVB 01 | Cha 01 = Kick
02_AVB 02 | Cha 02 = Snare
03_AVB 03 | Cha 03 = HiHat
04_AVB 04 | Cha 06 = Tom 3 (high)
05_AVB 05 | Cha 05 = Tom 2 (mid)
06_AVB 06 | Cha 04 = Tom 1 (low)
07_AVB 07 | Cha 08 = OH left (right)
08_AVB 08 | Cha 07 = OH right (left)

There should be a sixth video showing and explaining this theme, but it is obvious that for "normal" musicians this is already much too complicated. And even for an experienced "networkers" things look quite confusing and potentially dangerous for a live environment. If something goes south in a live event, how can you survive with this kind of setup?

It may be worth to think of a less complicated solution, eating less resources. In the next post I will present an alternative, which adds missing signals and expands mixing options. The drummer will get his own mix, but all other musicians (even if there would be three separate singers) get the same feeds. I am still thinking of what to do with EarMix channel 14, because it's empty... ;-)

SL16 | 32R | 16M

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by SwitchBack on Mon May 13, 2019 4:01 am
For 1, 2 and 3 I’d say don’t try to please too many with too much using only the EarMixes.

Basically I would provide stereo submixes (drums, brass, keys, ...) plus the personal instrument/voice to all. Patch left and right reversed for all the submixes to address the stage left/right thing. And those with special requirements or on wireless in-ears I would provide with a personal pair of auxes and UC Surface or QMix-UC.

First candidate for personal auxes is the drummer. No need to feed every single drum mic to all. So let the drummer manage his/her own drums aux mix and, as a bonus, if it’s good then it’s good for the rest of the band too ;)
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by wahlerstudios on Tue May 14, 2019 4:43 am
"Don’t try to please too many with too much..."

Exactly this. "Advanced" should NOT mean to waste all available AVB streams (62 of 64), but to retain flexibility. Here are the EarMix labels from my alternative to the routing used in the videos:

Attachments
EarMix Labels Video new.pdf
(34.52 KiB) Downloaded 15 times
EarMix Labels Video new.jpg

SL16 | 32R | 16M

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by wahlerstudios on Tue May 14, 2019 4:45 am
I can never forget being a lead and backing singer and keyboarder myself (I also play guitar and bass), when I plan a monitor setup for a gig / event. This is simply my "second nature". Therefore, when it comes to using personal monitor mixers like the EarMix, I really get serious... ;-) We are talking here about MAKING MUSIC and INSPIRATION, and not just "where is the volume knob for the guitar?" In the process of preparing a project with in ear monitoring involved, I like to spend some time to think about the question what I would like to hear as singer, as keyboarder, as guitarist etc. and how I can create a stimulating hearing situation, in which making music is fun. Drums is the most important musical "function" in a band, so I always start with drums. Have a look at the EarMix labels to follow my explanations.

THE DRUMMER HEARS...

My observation is that drummers do not want to hear a lot of overhead microphones and hihat. They want and need a LOUD kick and a LESS LOUD snare and SOME toms - which simply means an acoustic support for the more "distant" sound events of their drum kit. They can easily control hihat through the corresonding overhead microphone, so this makes it possible to move the bass to channel 8 of the EarMix and use channels 9 to 16 for a stereo mix of the six keyboard inputs, a stereo mix of two electric guitars (each stereo) plus one acoustic guitar (mono), a stereo mix of the vocals and a stereo mix for tracks, FX/reverb, ambience micophones, talkback and whatever is needed as additional signal input. Arranging the mixes does need time and attendance, but once things are set and people on stage "behave" during a concert, it doesn't need changes in the mixes itself. Click is not added as network signal. The drummer can add click to his EarMix via Aux In, if needed.

THE BAND (SINGERS INCLUDED) HEARS...

First of all - everybody in the band needs to hear THE SAME DRUM MIX, which the musicians can adjust in its overall volume as they need and want. It may make sense to emphasize kick and snare a little bit in this mix, but the natural overall impression should always be retained. The rest is self-explanatory. Everybody can control his own instrument (mostly in stereo) and if there were separate singers, they could also create their individual mixes. Channels 15+16 contain a stereo mix for tracks, FX / reverb, ambience microphones, talkback and whatever is needed as additional signal input. I haven't found anything to fill channel 14, so it may stay unused for now.

THE KEYBOARDER HEARS...

In the video there are six channels reserved for three stereo keyboards on the keyboard EarMix, but the rest of the band hears a stereo mix of ALL keyboards, which was mixed somehow somewhere. This is not a "good" idea. It is the keyboarder himself (and nobody else!), who needs to be able to control his keyboard mix for FOH and monitoring (wedges, in ear). This has to do with the musical intention and expression in the use of instruments and especially when keyboards are played parallel, there should NEVER different variations be heard ("the organ is too loud / not loud enough / I don't want to hear the organ..."). Therefore the keyboard mix should be made on a small mixer, feeding its stereo signal to PA, monitors and network. A flex mix on the FOH console used as subgroup can do the same job.

26 AVB SENDS INSTEAD OF 62...

#01 Kick
#02 Snare
#03 Tom 1
#04 Tom 2
#05 Tom 3
#06 Overhead left
#07 Overhead right
#08 Bass
#09+10 Guitar 1
#11+12 Guitar 2
#13 Acoustic Guitar
#14 Vocal 1
#15 Vocal 2
#16 Vocal 3
#17+18 Drum Mix
#19+20 Keyboards Mix
#21+22 Guitars Mix
#23+24 Vocals Mix
#25+26 FX / Ambience / Tracks / Talkback

I am sure that the projected band in the videos would also get along with this setup and maybe they would find this more suitable for making music and enjoying playing in the band. Very important is the addition of "room", may it be reverb or two or more ambience microphones. When being on stage, nobody wants to have the feeling of playing or singing in a booth. This is totally unnatural, in ear mixes need "space"!

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by wahlerstudios on Thu May 16, 2019 6:03 am
In Ear monitoring based on PA mix

There is a default AVB routing of the Series III consoles and rack mixers and this part of the routing always looks a little useless:

AVB sends 33+34: Aux In 1
AVB sends 35+36: Aux In 2
AVB sends 37+38: Tape In (Digital Return)
AVB sends 39+40: Main L/R

These eight more general sound sources seem not to fit to the idea of personal mixers. But they do and they can deliver everything to create a perfect in ear mix!

Some musicians do not like an individual mix, because they want to hear the overall sound and they are able to "adjust" their playing to it. Ideally, the PA mix should deliver what they expect, so AVB sends 39+40 could be the nucleus of their EarMix feeds. "Tape In/Digital Return" might also be a useful source and when the physical Aux Ins are not used, you can route any flex mix or the fixed subgroups to AVB sends 33+34 and 35+36.

Sure, not everybody is a professional musician and PA sound can not always be a perfect mix (soloists and "money channels" are usually too loud), so it makes sense to add some more sources. Very often it needs "just a little bit" of a drum mix or band mix or singer mix etc., to make the sound complete and inspiring. Here is an example for a complete setup with Main L/R as the basic source:

01+02 | AVB sends 57+58: Mix Drums / Percussion...
03+04 | AVB sends 59+60: Mix Band / Instruments...
05+06 | AVB sends 61+62: Mix Brass / Strings...
07+08 | AVB sends 63+64: Mix Singers / Choir...

09+10 | AVB sends 33+34: Ambience microphones
11+12 | AVB sends 35+36: Talkback, Click...
13+14 | AVB sends 37+38: Tape In (Digital Return)
15+16 | AVB sends 39+40: Main L/R

Mostly the PA mix will have some FX involved, so it doesn't need a separate FX feed for the EarMixers, but the ideal of a "natural" sound implies the use of ambience microphones, because they add dimension to the sound. Usually there are two ambience microphones, but four or six well placed microphones will improve the sound even more for the musicians. In order to get left and right fitting, simply switch the AVB sends:

01+02 | AVB sends 58+57: Mix Drums / Percussion...
03+04 | AVB sends 60+59: Mix Band / Instruments
...
15+16 | AVB sends 40+39: Main L/R.

(Please note that when you use a rack mixer as stagebox, outputs PA left & right will be also switched. AVB sends can not be handled separate, so you need to change left & right at the physical outputs one more time.)

When the band is using in ear monitoring and there are no or not many noisy amps on stage, this concept can work prettty well for small gigs also. It doesn't need a "big" stage to make a good sound. The PA mix as nucleus for in ear monitoring is THE counterpart to the standard approach of being able to control ALL inputs (which is anyway only possible when there are not more than 16 inputs). The PA mix approach is somehow extreme, but it makes more sense than isolating musicians and letting them decide what they want to hear. On a stage musicians play TOGETHER, don't they...?

Knowing that the musicians are listening to the PA mix makes the sound engineer become part of the musical performance. Anyway, he should never mix his "own" sound, but transport the band's vision of how they want to sound. Insofar using the PA mix as main monitor source is not at all strange. It's especially worth trying to rehearse like this, because it brings a band (and their sound engineer) more together than having everybody hear and mix what he likes, or not...

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by wahlerstudios on Fri May 17, 2019 6:23 am
Explanation in the next post.

Attachments
Matrix-Mix Drums_800.jpg

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by wahlerstudios on Fri May 17, 2019 6:23 am
This is basically the same approach (In Ear monitoring based on PA mix), but there is only one matrix mix going to the EarMix. The drummer's mix is the example and the PA mix (Main, white fader) is the nucleus of the mix he/she is hearing. On the right side of UC Surface are input channels 1 to 32, the four FX returns, the two Aux In's, Tape In (Digital Return) and Talkback (green faders), on the left side are the flex mixes (yellow faders). The fixed subgroups (blue faders) are used for Loop and Intercom (communication on stage). One of the advantages of this approach is that Main l/r outputs do not need to be switched, just the matrix mix itself.

UC Surface (not QMix!) on a tablet or computer is needed for this solution and the EarMix is used only as headphone amp, receiving the stereo signal of this matrix mix. I just wanted to add this as an option. WARNING: Not all musicians will get along with complex structures like this..

:mrgreen:

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by wahlerstudios on Sat May 18, 2019 8:03 am
In Ear monitoring based on the drummer's mix

It seems to have got lost nowadays that the drummer is THE HEART OF THE BAND, and not the click from the track / loop machine and the anonymous voice. It still is the drummer who leads the band in a concert and all musicians and singers on stage can benefit from a drummer, who knows his role and is able to fill it. Drummers do NOT only hear their drum kit. They will always be interested to hear if the band is following their playing - and that is what makes the drummer's in ear mix so interesting!

Of course, the drum kit will be quite loud in the mix (some things like snare, hihat or bass might be less loud as you would expect), but you will be able to hear all relevant sound events on stage very clearly. And you will hear how the drummer is playing with the musical material and how he accents the flow of a song. When the drummer is directing the band through the songs, the other musicians will adjust their playing to it, which always makes the overall result more tight and tasty. Vice versa, a drummer hearing the other instruments on stage well, will also respond to the playing. The result this kind of interactivity is that nobody plays too much any more and the band starts developing its own unique sound.

The layout of the EarMixers could be like this:

01+02 | AVB sends 58+57: Mix drums
03 | AVB send 59: Kick
04 | AVB send 60: Snare
05 | AVB send 61: Bass
06 | AVB send 62: Vocal 1
07 | AVB send 63: Vocal 2
08 | AVB send 64: Vocal 3

09+10 | AVB sends 50+49: Mix keys
11+12 | AVB sends 52+51: Mix guitars
13+14 | AVB sends 54+53: Mix ...
15+16 | AVB sends 56+55: Ambience / FX

If you have the privilege to work with a drummer, who really is into the music and has an eye (ear...) for the whole band, you do not really need to hear more than your drummer's in ear mix. Believe me... ;-)

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by SwitchBack on Sat May 18, 2019 10:51 am
Just to throw one in as well:

Example for a 9-piece band: drums/vocals, bass/vocals, guitar/vocals, keys/vocals, alto sax, baritone sax, trumpet, trombone, percussion

EarMix channels for all (AVB41-48):
01/02 = guitar/fx (mix by the guitar-player from the pedalboard)
03/04 = keys/fx aux (mix by the keyboard-player through QMix/UC Surface)
05/06 = percussion/fx aux (mix by the percussionist through QMix/UC Surface)
07/08 = drums/fx aux (mix by the drummer through QMix/UC Surface)

EarMix channels for the singers (AVB49-56):
09 = bass
10 = vox 1
11 = vox 2
12 = vox 3
13 = vox 4
14 = -
15/16 = brass/woodwind and ambience aux (mix by sound engineer)

EarMix channels for the brass/woodwind section (AVB57-64):
09 = bass
10 = alto sax
11 = baritone sax
12 = trumpet
13 = trombone
14 = -
15/16 = vox and ambience aux (mix by sound engineer)

The percussionist isn’t singing so he/she can use either second bank. All those on EarMixes use the EarMix to adjust their personal in-ear mix. Those with QMix/UC Surface too use the app only to adjust the aux mix for their own instrument(s). The frontman (whoever that is) probably is completely wireless. In that case he/she should get a personal full mix aux pair from the console, controlling it through QMix/Wheel of Me. No need for an EarMix there.

NB. The example has half the band singing but that can be separate singers too ;)
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by wahlerstudios on Mon May 20, 2019 6:38 am
There are amazingly many videos on YouTube with examples of in ear monitoring from many musical genres. It's worth to have a closer look and just listen to what musicians hear. Here are a few examples. You can partly see which equipment was involved, but that's not really important. Just listen to the examples and imagine yourself playing an instrument or singing in that particular "acoustic environment".

Third Day Monitor Mixes - Scotty Wilbanks (I Got A Feeling)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLPWiwKw-H8
* Quite a good in ear mix for the keyboarder/singer

Kevin Murphy drumcam with Jon Pardi (live)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWIDdBF-VRk
* Does this sound like playing in a big hall? Stereo only for drums?

Kevin Murphy drumcam w/ ear mix
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MclrTUHYxSU
* Too little "band", but interesting managing of rhythms and effects

Lester Estelle drum cam. Mr. Know It All & Miss Independent
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXc8Te7ZJVA
* Just a little more "room" and vocals and it would be perfect

In ear mix - Lion And The Lamb
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YO9vgVTXbYs
* Bad example, are there roboters playing...?

Love So Great-Hillsong Worship In Ear Mix
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gf0N_mjtTOc
* Bad example, too many mono sounds, no room/dimension...

Everlasting God By William Murphy (Full Version) CAG Version
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQqdGaBIat0
* Quite a nice one, but loop too loud and choir not loud enough...

I Will Call Upon The Lord: C.A.G. Band
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UudzFH9ZJrk
* Nearly perfect, but not enough ambience

CAG Band: P&W Groove
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Zhv8GYx3NA
* Nice, but much too much and "dark" ambience in mono, not enough drums...

Nate Morton Drum Cam 32
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwg3vC_fvEM
* TV sound at its best... (The Voice, just playback)

Jammcard Presents: Cory Henry and the Funk Apostles LIVE at the JammJam - Trade It All
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsCZUqiYRRo
* This is how in ear monitoring should sound

Snarky Puppy - Sleeper (We Like It Here)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDXnPfA_5pY
* Simply enjoyable; check out the other videos of the "We Like It Here" DVD...

This is supposed to be my final post to this little series of how to use the EarMixers. I hope, the series was informative, inspiring and entertaining. It's a never ending "story"... ;-)

How do YOU use the EarMix system?

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by wahlerstudios on Sun Jun 02, 2019 1:40 pm
Over 1000 views... The theme of this thread seems so be interesting. I mean, it really is. Therefore I would like to add some more videos with in ear mixes. One tip: Do NOT WATCH the videos, listen to the music only!

Dream Theater Live In Saitama Japan 2014 (HD + IEM Audio)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XjDCtpGllMU
* Too much of "me"...?

You Are Everything//Tye Tribbet//LIVE//DRUM CAM\\
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ef3gD5xhvho
* Perfect for drums and bass, maybe a little more reverb would be nice... K2StiXx has more of that kind of videos...

My LIVE In ear mix
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jO7S9AG3Ad8
* A good one...

U2 Boy Falls From The Sky (360° Live From Coimbra) IEM [Multicam Full HD Made By Mek]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Un5nNizYozI
* So pure...

Muse - Madness (IEM Mix) Bercy - 2016
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bO1kkLWH-RA
* Good balance between stage and auditorium

Third Day Monitor Mixes - David Carr (Kicking And Screaming)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLhTThVIpBU
*Alone on stage...?

IN JESUS NAME | JORDAN SUNNASY, IEM MIX
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l_6O6cexcCk
* Would be nice to hear this without distortion, but why is the voice so clear?

Bass Cam - That Don't Impress Me Much
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLBBmR-xAbs
* Perfect

Brighter Live | Drums | Hillsong Young & Free
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0v7Ki_7WTP8
* Not bad

Our God - Chris Tomlin | Chris McBride Trio
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fnyWY2NA2a0
* Perfect rehearsal sound, could be more bass

Brian Culbertson- Back in the Day & So Good
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DCopcNpzc60
* Inspiring in ear sound

Anthony Brancati: Neo-Funk (ft. Larnell Lewis & Robi Botos)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34pHnL0OFto
* Another good one. They have some fun...

Shaun Martin - Yellow Jacket (7 Summers)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XlcKiizWQVI
* Perfect

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