Discuss Notion Music Composition Software here.
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Hi,
I'm using studio one 3 artist as a tool for aiding in creating notation because I'm not great with notation values. My process is to play my songs through a midi keyboard to a metronome in studio one 3 artist, Then I go back through the tracks and refine the midi notes along the respective grid lines for values until they are all in time. Often that means using triplets of one value or another.
My problem is when I export to notion 6 I never see the triplets represented. Instead there are awkward combinations of dotted 32nd and 64th notes utilized by the program. Which needlessly complicates the score.
Is there something I can do to remedy this situation.
Thanks,
Thimble
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by Surf.Whammy on Sun Jun 09, 2019 5:42 pm
You might have a bit of success if you quantize the MIDI in Studio One before sending it to NOTION . . .

If you do a manual MIDI export from Studio One to NOTION, then when you import the MIDI file ("*.mid") to NOTION, it starts a new NOTION score and probably will display the MIDI in sequencer format. If this is what happens, then you can set the granularity in NOTION and can quantize the MIDI in NOTION before converting it from MIDI to music notation . . .

For reference, there is not a one-to-one mapping of MIDI to music notation, so there nearly always will be a bit of imprecision when converting MIDI to music notation . . .

Nevertheless, with a bit of experimenting you should be able to get better results with the MIDI to music notation conversion . . .

As you know, MIDI is the acronym for Musical Instrument Digital Interface, and this provides the clue that MIDI is digital . . .

In contrast, music notation is analog, which in practice means that determining the best match for a digital note duration is more of an art than a science . . .

THOUGHTS

Explained another way, MIDI and digital music are based on slices of time, which in the digital sampling universe are discrete snapshots colloquially called "lollipops", where for standard CD quality audio, there are 44,100 "lollipops" per second, where each "lollipop" has a grand total of two parameters: (a) arrival time and (b) amplitude between -1 and +1 . . .

This is sufficient to reproduce music accurately with high precision, but it is not based on continuous time . . .

Instead, it is based on creating the illusion of continuous time . . .

This strategy works nicely for humans, but there are gaps between the time slices . . .

Analog-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analog devices (AD/DA) provide sufficient "smoothing" to make the perception of music remarkably realistic, but it's an illusion . . .

One might think that increasing the sample rate above standard CD audio quality (44.1-kHz) or standard audio quality for video (48-kHz) is good, but it's nonsense and serves only to require folks to have more system memory, larger hard drives, faster computers, and vastly more expensive studio monitors . . .

Making high sample rates all the more absurd is the fact that most humans cannot hear anything about perhaps 15-kHz, and if they have attended a popular music concert, KISS concert, or similar, then somewhere in the range of 13-kHz is at the top of their frequency perception . . .

George Martin (Produce for the Beatles) explained this fact with a bit of British humor, when he stated that at the end of the "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" album on vinyl, which was the media at the time, he added some 17-kHz tones to entertain dogs and cats . . .

The Beatles had a bit of FUN in a similar way by reciting gibberish, so this was George Martin's way of having a bit of FUN, too . . .

[NOTE: There is a bit of controversy regarding whether the tone is 15-kHz or 17-kHz, but I recall George Martin stating that he added a 17-kHz tone. Either way, (15-kHz or 17-kHz), it's a good clue to what happens with human perception of sound. I found another interview where George Martin said the tone is 18-kHz . . . ]

"MARTIN: There was - they were exactly what people - people found in them what they wanted to find. There was no messages. We'd put nothing in there. That was not intentional. At the end of "Pepper," when we put it all together, we did two things which were in-jokes for us. One was to put a ridiculous amount of sound in the run-out groove and the other was to put an 18 kilocycle - kilohertz note on the end of it for dogs, we'd say, because poor dogs hadn't got anything to listen to. It was just an in-joke. We just did it for the heck of it. And the sounds that I put on in the inner groove, I just said to the chaps, the boys, all right, go down to the studio and do anything you like. Just sing anything or shout anything you like. And I just - they just do about five seconds of mumbo-jumbo, which really wasn't anything. And I lopped off two seconds of it and made a loop of it and put it on the run-out groove. Well, it so happened that people started playing it backwards and finding out all sorts of obscene messages, but it certainly wasn't intentional."

[SOURCE: "Remembering Record Producer George Martin, The 'Fifth Beatle'{NPR) ]

[NOTE: Paul McCartney provides his recollection starting at 7:00 in this YouTube interview . . . ]

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Lots of FUN! :)

The Surf Whammys

Sinkhorn's Dilemma: Every paradox has at least one non-trivial solution!
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by thimblewit on Tue Jun 11, 2019 2:45 pm
Thanks for the response surf whammy. I have tried what you suggested. I'm going to look more into using the sequencer overlay. As far as I can tell I can't edit values there. Only velocity of notes.
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by thimblewit on Tue Jun 11, 2019 3:21 pm
Ok, I found the sequencer help in the manual. I still don't see how to use triplets there. I do think it has a lot of potential as a tool. Not sure for me though. Studio1 3 sequencer/piano roll is much faster to work with for me. I noticed that despite importing perfectly quantized notes the notion sequencer notes ran on beyond bars. However where proper values when converted to notation.
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by Surf.Whammy on Tue Jun 11, 2019 8:13 pm
thimblewit wroteOk, I found the sequencer help in the manual. I still don't see how to use triplets there. I do think it has a lot of potential as a tool. Not sure for me though. Studio1 3 sequencer/piano roll is much faster to work with for me. I noticed that despite importing perfectly quantized notes the notion sequencer notes ran on beyond bars. However where proper values when converted to notation.


One of my suggestions is to quantize two times . . . :)

(1) First, when you are ready to export the MIDI from Studio One, quantize it using the Studio One quantizer . . .

(2) Then export it as MIDI, which creates a "*.mid" file . . .

(3) Import the exported MIDI file into NOTION, which will create a new NOTION score and will display the MIDI notes in sequencer format . . .

(4) Quantize again, but this time use the NOTION MIDI quantizer . . .

(5) Then convert the now quantized MIDI to music notation, which is done via a menu option . . .

Double quantizing might provide a bit of clarity, although this is only a guess . . .

Lots of FUN! :)

The Surf Whammys

Sinkhorn's Dilemma: Every paradox has at least one non-trivial solution!

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