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Sax midi sound sound a 3rd higher than written. For example I have written A natural and its playing a B
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by thomasbaxter on Tue Sep 11, 2018 8:52 am
Under View you have the option of transposed, concert tuning or concert pitch. Which one is checked?
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by Surf.Whammy on Wed Sep 12, 2018 10:43 am
These are a few more observations in addition to the vastly important question thomasbaxter posed . . . :)

THOUGHTS

(1) Transposing instruments were devised many years ago in an effort to confuse as many people as possible, with particular focus on discouraging younger folks from pursuing productive careers in music . . .

Consider the electric guitar, which by unanimous decree of everyone who teaches and composes for guitar--except me--is a transposing instrument . . .

Specifically, electric guitar music notation is written one octave lower, which among other things creates the confusing deception that "Middle C" is the note at the third fret of the low-pitch "A" string . . .

It also provides the equally confusing "information" that "Concert A" is the note at the second fret of the high-pitch "g" string . . .

This deception is cruel, and it rises to the level of a crime against nature and everything that is good . . .

The facts of the matter are (a) that the "Middle C" on electric guitar at standard tuning ("Concert A" = 440-Hz) is the note at the first fret of the high-pitch "b" string and (b) that "Concert A" is the note at the fifth fret of the high-pitch "e" string . . .

Among other disturbing bits of information, this led me to think that Elvis Presley and the Beatles were sopranos--a confusing delusion that persisted until just a few years ago when I discovered the facts about electric guitar notation and the evils of transposing instruments . . .

This occurred even though decades ago I learned that electric bass and electric guitar players must be eternally vigilant when they interact with those unusual but musically interesting entities colloquially called "horn sections" . . .

As everyone who ever has interacted with a "horn section" knows full well, they have three primary characteristics:

(a) They all know how to read music notation, and they understand music theory intimately . . .

(b) They know a lot of totally impressive, choreographed "dance moves" and can perform them when playing . . .

(c) They demand to play songs in strange and bizarre key signatures . . .

For an electric bass player, this is not so much of a problem; but for electric guitar players, this is a big problem--until you learn Barre chords, at which time no "horn section" can defeat you . . .

If the "horn section" has one of their daily team meetings and declares that a song, which is easy to play on electric guitar in the key of A, instead must be played in the key of B♭, then when you know Barre chords, you can suggest that the song will sound better if played in the key of A#, since to play the song in A# you just need to move the Barre chords upward by one fret . . .

Since in normal circumstances A# is the same as B♭, the "horn section" will agree with your suggestion and grin among themselves because as they see it, this is indisputable evidence of what they already "know", which is that you are not the brightest candle on the musical cake . . .

But you are the one who has the best laugh . . .

It's true! :+1

(2) By default, NOTION does not use the Global Tuning value for standard "Concert A", which by convention is 440-Hz and since the 1930s has been broadcast hourly in America for the specific purpose of providing a standard tuning pitch for orchestras, bands, and vocal groups . . .

If you want your songs to be tuned correctly for the various types and styles of generally accepted "popular music", then you need to set the Global Tuning pitch in NOTION to 440-Hz, which is done in NOTION "Preferences" . . .

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A440 Pitch Standard ~ Wikipedia

(3) It's possible on some MIDI keyboard synthesizers to set the reference tuning pitch to a non-standard value, in which case the MIDI device will produce notes that are "transposed"--and in a curious way is the MIDI device analog of Barre chords--which relevant to this topic is a possible problem if the sounds are provided by an external MIDI keyboard and synthesizer which is being played by notes generated via music notation on NOTION External MIDI staves and then sent to the respective external MIDI keyboard synthesizer for rendering, although it's not entirely clear whether an external MIDI keyboard synthesizer arbitrarily can override the MIDI note information sent to it by NOTION, but with a bit of custom external MIDI programming, it's at least a possibility . . .

SUMMARY

There are no mysteries . . .

The interval from A4 to B4 is a whole-step (or two half-steps) . . .

If a notated A4 sounds like a B4, then the most likely cause is one of the three possibilities described above, but it might be a combination of such possibilities--unless you are referring to a Hammond B4 organ, which is another matter altogether . . .

Everything is easier when you know Barre chords . . .

You cannot play early James Brown songs without a "horn section" . . .

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Lots of FUN! :)

The Surf Whammys

Sinkhorn's Dilemma: Every paradox has at least one non-trivial solution!
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by johnnewberry on Fri Sep 14, 2018 12:23 pm
Hi.

charlycastiblanco wroteSax midi sound sound a step higher than written

• This would require and be the resulting sound after changing the staff to an transposing instrument in - D -.

charlycastiblanco wroteSax midi sound sound a 3rd higher than written

• This would be the resultant sound when transposed to - E - .

charlycastiblanco wroteFor example I have written A natural and its playing a B

• This is the same as that in the post title when in transposed view of an instrument transposed to - D - .


,Newberry

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