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How are people using Chord Track to write NEW songs?

Posted: Mon Mar 30, 2020 12:32 pm
by chrisboshuizen
All the examples of Chord Track seem to focus changing a pre-recorded midi or audio part. Even the song writing examples show how to change up a first draft. However, to want to write a new song from scratch, how are people going about that?

I noticed that the Chord Track has one limitation in that it can't add intervals that aren't already there (in parallel mode) and won't add extra needed notes to voice a full chord in narrow mode, so if there is no 7th note played in the source (midi) it won't add one. So I tried creating a basic 4- bar rhythm arrangement, with the tonic 7th chord in midi. I then duplicated this a dozen times. This works fine for basic triads and 7ths.

Going a step further, I filled out a full stack of all 12 notes in an octave (C through B) and set the Follow Chords mode to "Narrow".
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This then allowed chords to be faithfully translated no matter what I selected.
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Have you tried any other approaches? Share tips here!

Re: How are people using Chord Track to write NEW songs?

Posted: Mon Mar 30, 2020 5:52 pm
by Bbd
Have you seen these?

viewtopic.php?f=153&t=30324
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iwe7ECDJuU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E_VFYjwnD8E
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_3CMsyfWqo

There's a lot more out there.

I like how you asked for other creative ways to use chord track.
Hopefully others will chime in.

Re: How are people using Chord Track to write NEW songs?

Posted: Mon Mar 30, 2020 11:29 pm
by chrisboshuizen
Thanks, yes, I have seen most of those, and they mostly seem to start with a pre-recorded section. The second vid you posted autogenerates a bass part which is nice. The user guide, sadly, says nothing about writing from scratch -- seem like that wasn't really a use case considered?

The third vid is close to what I was looking for, but if you are trying to write chord progressions using the chord arranger alone, you'll still have missing intervals if you work on a block of triad chords only.

Re: How are people using Chord Track to write NEW songs?

Posted: Thu Apr 16, 2020 4:50 pm
by snb1
chrisboshuizen wroteAll the examples of Chord Track seem to focus changing a pre-recorded midi or audio part. Even the song writing examples show how to change up a first draft. However, to want to write a new song from scratch, how are people going about that?


One sure way to start a song from scratch using the chord track is to use the chord track to analyze the chords of a song that you like, delete the song, set your instrument track to follow chords and start playing random chords and or melodies not worrying if you're in key or hitting the right notes. As long as you know the shape of your melody your trying to create, i.e, do you want the melody to go up, down, or both, and or the rhythm and feel of a chord progression, lay that down and let the chord track correct the notes and chords. Then from there start tweaking the midi to get it to sound how you want to. But I will say that playing closely to what you want will get you to where you want to go faster that just hitting random notes with out a sense of direction if that makes sense.

Re: How are people using Chord Track to write NEW songs?

Posted: Fri Apr 17, 2020 8:17 am
by dgkenney
I have had success in using a program called "Scaler" to generate interesting progressions. It's a relatively inexpensive program (~$50) that is extremely powerful in composing progressions. I then drag'n'drop the resulting midi into S1 and extract to chord track. This helps with composing additional tracks such as strings, bass, etc. Also the ability to change the tonic of the chords with the chord track is valuable.

https://www.pluginboutique.com/product/ ... 933-Scaler

Re: How are people using Chord Track to write NEW songs?

Posted: Sun May 31, 2020 11:36 am
by brianparker8
I use scaler but sometimes a quick use of the chord track will be to bounce my chords up to the chord track and then record something messy on the keyboard. I'll try some of the follow modes on that track to see if anything sounds better.

Once you have some tracks that are following the chord track you can change a chord to see if the whole thing sounds better. I've found a lot of good sounds just messing around like that.