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I understand EQ is a deep subject but I'm hoping you can answer my questions and give me some pointers so I can start to have a go and let my ears guide me.

I went to have a play with the EQ and not only am I dazzled by the aray of EQ settings but I don't seem to be able to apply EQ to all the guitar tracks (I usually have 2 lead and 2 rhythm) so is there a way around having to repeat everything 4 times?

Also, can you give me some pointers? I know it;s all in your ears but in order to tweak so that it sounds right I need to know what the buttons do. I gather LF is low frequency (ie: bass) and MF is middle and HF will be treble but within each are icons I don't recognise - Q, gain, freq. There are also other sections I don't recognise - LC, LMF, HMF and HC

I've heard that you're meant to view the sound (as it plays) on a graph and spot peaks and where the instruments are placed in the mix, enabling you to find the perfect spot in the stereo field to place your tracks (such as guitar solos). The down side is I have no idea how to do this. I did manage to click on something and a bouncing bar graph appeared but only for the one track -the EQ had been applied to - thus not letting me see how it interacts with the other tracks. I clicked on "all" at the top, hoping it would then include all the other tracks but it didn't change away from the solitary track.

Finally, even if I do get to work the EQ what should I be looking for? A curve appeared on the EQ (and it was colour coded in places) that I could manipulate with my mouse, pushing it up or down at any point I wished and altering the EQ but I had no idea it was or what would happen when I altered a specific point and of course that is not helpful when you want to alter a specific part of the sound but don't know whereabouts on the graph to do it! Also, is tweaking this graph the same as tweaking the controls (LF, HF, MF etc)? I assume so.


Thanks in advance.
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by matthewgorman on Wed Nov 19, 2014 5:49 pm
For the first question, there may be reasons to eq all guitars separately. 2 tracks of rhythmn processed separately is what can give a a fuller sound. But if you do want them to all sound the same, there are 2 main ways to do that. First, put pro eq on the first track and adjust. Then drag that to the other 3. Or, route all 4 tracks to a bus, and apply the eq to the bus.

In order to keep it simple, the only things to worry about what they are is q, freq, and gain, and also lc and hc. The other initials mentioned are just cookie cutter names for where the frequency band is set.

Pro eq is a parametric eq (as opposed to a graphic eq, google is your friend here). The reference to frequency is where you are setting the center of your eq adjustment. You may see on the plugin, that there is a spike at 130hz on your bass track that you would like to knock down. You set the frequency to 130hz to make your adjustment. The adjustment you make is the gain. In this case, gain is the same as volume. You are increasing or decreasing the volume of a certain frequency, not the total volume. Q is a setting that tells the eq how wide(smaller q), or how narrow (larger q) the gain adjustment is going to be. If you just want to affect 130hz, then you go with a narrow q. If you want to sweep a wider area, and adjust with the same move 50hz above and below 130hz, then make the q number smaller until you are where you need to be. You will see the bell narrow and widen as you adjust.

HC and LC are frequency cut offs. A setting of say 50hz on a LC means that the eq stRts to eliminate all frequencies below 50 hz. There is a slope assigned (6db, 12db, 24db, and 36db). That slope determines how drastic that cut is. 6db is very gentle, while 36db is almost a cliff. The reverse is true about HC. A setting of 15khz means that frequencies are lowered ABOVE 15khz. Slopes and what they do are the same.

Dont worry about what the other initials are, as they are just a guide. Pro eq is a fully parametric eq, so each band can be set to any frequency. The initials are maybe just an easier way to keep track of what is adjusting what.

Matt

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by ApplewoodRecording on Fri Nov 21, 2014 11:28 am
As long as we're on this topic, can someone tell me when and why the letter q was chosen for the bandwidth control? For my live setup, I use a Samson D3500 parametric eq, and the bandwidth knob is called "bandwidth". Unless there is a good reason for it of which I am not aware, it's my opinion that the letter q is not helpful to a noob.

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by matthewgorman on Fri Nov 21, 2014 11:44 am
ApplewoodRecording wroteAs long as we're on this topic, can someone tell me when and why the letter q was chosen for the bandwidth control? For my live setup, I use a Samson D3500 parametric eq, and the bandwidth knob is called "bandwidth". Unless there is a good reason for it of which I am not aware, it's my opinion that the letter q is not helpful to a noob.


I'm thinking this is more of a question for Samson, and why did they change q to bandwidth. That is the only box that I have ever seen that refers to q as bandwidth.

Matt

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by ApplewoodRecording on Fri Nov 21, 2014 12:20 pm
I stand corrected.

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by matthewgorman on Fri Nov 21, 2014 12:37 pm
ApplewoodRecording wroteI stand corrected.


Sorry if I came across as smart a$$y. Certainly wasn't the intent. Just wanted the correct information out there for you guys.

Carry on.

Matt

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by willowhaus on Fri Nov 21, 2014 12:43 pm
It has to do with the mathematical equations surrounding resonance.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q_factor

The concept of "Q" originated with K.S. Johnson of Western Electric Company's Engineering Department while evaluating the quality of coils (inductors). His choice of the symbol Q was only because all other letters of the alphabet were taken.


So, as you can see - a very good reason. :D I suspect that Samson used "bandwidth" to be less confusing.

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by ApplewoodRecording on Fri Nov 21, 2014 12:50 pm
Sorry if I came across as smart a$$y.


No worries. I appreciate the info.

So, as you can see - a very good reason.


Yes indeed :lol:

2 Audio Technica AT-3035's
Shure PG-58 (It does a good job for me)
Presonus Studio One version 2.5.1
Acer intel I5
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1992 Taylor 612ce
Handmade Custom Seldon Resophonic Guitar

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by spookyghost on Wed Nov 26, 2014 6:57 am
matthewgorman wroteFor the first question, there may be reasons to eq all guitars separately. 2 tracks of rhythmn processed separately is what can give a a fuller sound. But if you do want them to all sound the same, there are 2 main ways to do that. First, put pro eq on the first track and adjust. Then drag that to the other 3. Or, route all 4 tracks to a bus, and apply the eq to the bus.

In order to keep it simple, the only things to worry about what they are is q, freq, and gain, and also lc and hc. The other initials mentioned are just cookie cutter names for where the frequency band is set.

Pro eq is a parametric eq (as opposed to a graphic eq, google is your friend here). The reference to frequency is where you are setting the center of your eq adjustment. You may see on the plugin, that there is a spike at 130hz on your bass track that you would like to knock down. You set the frequency to 130hz to make your adjustment. The adjustment you make is the gain. In this case, gain is the same as volume. You are increasing or decreasing the volume of a certain frequency, not the total volume. Q is a setting that tells the eq how wide(smaller q), or how narrow (larger q) the gain adjustment is going to be. If you just want to affect 130hz, then you go with a narrow q. If you want to sweep a wider area, and adjust with the same move 50hz above and below 130hz, then make the q number smaller until you are where you need to be. You will see the bell narrow and widen as you adjust.

HC and LC are frequency cut offs. A setting of say 50hz on a LC means that the eq stRts to eliminate all frequencies below 50 hz. There is a slope assigned (6db, 12db, 24db, and 36db). That slope determines how drastic that cut is. 6db is very gentle, while 36db is almost a cliff. The reverse is true about HC. A setting of 15khz means that frequencies are lowered ABOVE 15khz. Slopes and what they do are the same.

Dont worry about what the other initials are, as they are just a guide. Pro eq is a fully parametric eq, so each band can be set to any frequency. The initials are maybe just an easier way to keep track of what is adjusting what.


Thanks for the detailed response. The downside is it's still gone over my head and I still don't know how to interpret EQ so as to

a) know what to boost or limit (as per your 130hz bass spike example) or
b) know where to place them in the mix (ie: it's not always hard left and right).


Also:


You may see on the plugin, that there is a spike at 130hz on your bass track that you would like to knock down. You set the frequency to 130hz to make your adjustment. The adjustment you make is the gain. In this case, gain is the same as volume. You are increasing or decreasing the volume of a certain frequency, not the total volume.

So in this example I would be reducing the gain (volume) of that frequency to eliminate it?
How do I make an adjustment in the EQ?


HC and LC are frequency cut offs. A setting of say 50hz on a LC means that the eq stRts to eliminate all frequencies below 50 hz. There is a slope assigned (6db, 12db, 24db, and 36db). That slope determines how drastic that cut is. 6db is very gentle, while 36db is almost a cliff. The reverse is true about HC. A setting of 15khz means that frequencies are lowered ABOVE 15khz. Slopes and what they do are the same.

What do HC and LC stand for?
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by matthewgorman on Wed Nov 26, 2014 9:43 am
a) know what to boost or limit (as per your 130hz bass spike example) or
b) know where to place them in the mix (ie: it's not always hard left and right).


You will see in the eq plug the frequencies are shown in the gui as the song plays. A spike at a frequency will be seen in the gui. You can then move a frequency knob over to that spike, and use the gain knob to reduce the spike.

Where to place instruments in a mix is very subjective, and depends greatly on the material. Best thing to do is to spend some time listening to familiar commercial recordings in the same environment that you mix in. You will start to hear where things are placed in the stereo field in different styles, and can better see what works for you and your material.

[quote][/What do HC and LC stand for? quote]

High Cut and Low Cut. For further confusion, you will also see them referred to as High Pass (low cut), and low pass (high cut) filters.

Matt

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